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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
of fiscal resources and the state of our economy. i'm not a foreign policy guy or a strategic guy, but that seems, obviously, right to me. if you can't aboard the kind of military you need to project power, if you can't afford to fund the state department in the kinds of ways it should be doing, no matter how many people we have or how wealthy some of our citizens are. i don't worry, if you don't mind my digressing slightly, i don't worry about china being a bigger economy than we are. i don't honestly care how big china is. they do have three-and-a-half times more people than we do. i'm more concerned with how big we are -- >> how big or how rich? >> well, i put them in the same -- rich being gdp. how successful are we economically. um, and so i do think it is, i think resolving the fiscal thing is of essential importance to our business community in terms of deciding how much they're going to spend, where they're going to invest, how many people they're going to hire and, therefore, to our position in the world. not just the problem of our debt and deficit, but unless we, unless
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evident by the remotely standing crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president, transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the are presidential cycle to impact the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where as necessary, seeks con fir nation, goes through reassessment, definition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrates to the changes, or as people say, the lack of changes, here in washington. at t
-- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, but fiscal cliff for example, and packed for policy. let's not forget, as the world rick roberts to the changes -- or some people get -- some people say, a lack of changes -- here in washington. let's not forget that hist
are well versed in the history of china's foreign policy. the is not a simple bureaucratic politician. there is a degree of relaxation, candor, and to the extent humor in his exchanges. >> he is not going to be a dominant leader. he is going to have to create a consensus in the leading body. that is not going to be easy to do. there is enormous opposition to reform, both political and economic. >> xi jinping -- i think more and more numbered generation educated in free countries, they already got some sort of experience, the value of free world. judging that way, i feel there is a possibility, a real chance to change for political reform. >> with me, tim wilcox. our headlines. xi jinping has become china's new leader. he smiled and waved after being selected as the new leader. three hamas leaders died in airstrikes. hundreds of supporters have turned out on the streets of gaza for the funeral of a militant leader who was killed in an air strike on wednesday. 10 other people died and that attacked. in the past few hours, israeli authorities say three people were killed from a rocket fi
.i.a. then former senator evan bayh on the fiscal cliff. then senior editor of foreign policy magazine will be on. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post,"
sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for sometime. as the president's new or old team takes shape, and where necessary, seeks confirmation, as the new old team goes through the inevidentble period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and not forget as the world recalibrates changes or
an audience. you know, when you are the president's foreign policy spokesman and you are hanging out and have the israeli prime minister and then the chairman trying to reach a middle east peace, you go, okay, what we tell the press? and you say, you can tell them whatever you want except for this and that. and what else is there? [laughter] but now we have dennis ross was out of government. and he is writing a new book. when you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with iran, whether the nuclear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. in 2009 when you were at the state department as the special envoy forswore wrong, there was a strategy of both engagement and pressure. going back to 2009 there is the engagement that has continued at a certain level through the five plus one process, but then there has been focused over the last couple of years on pressure sanctions and the 40% drop in iranian currency shows that we now have the pressure of the last couple
. host: benjamin pauker is senior editor of "foreign policy magazine." we'll get to your calls in a minute. could there be foreign policy fallout in the benghazi attacks on libya? guest: i think there's a lot we don't know. this is one of those scandals that comes out in dribs and drabs. drip, leak, leak, leak. i think there is a sort of consensus that we want to know more. the american public wants to know more. certainly journalists do. there could be political fallout from it. this is a week where there's going to be a number of hearings on ben gaza. so both the house and senator intelligence committees were meeting. there is certainly, congressionally, the desire to hear more and hear more facts. there are big questions that are unanswered. both in the time frame of what happened in the attack, little bits of information, but also in terms of whether the u.s. was ill prepared or naive in terms of providing security for ambassador chris stevens. any tragedy where an ambassador dies and three other americans, there needs to be an investigation. host: will in tennessee, indepe
not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater threats to our closest allies and to ourselves? unfortunately, that's what we're seeing. in fact, i had seen an article in may of 2010 that indicated that this administration, the obama administration, sided with israel's enemies in demanding that israel disclose any nuclear weapons. we had never sided with israel's enemies in trying to push israel into doing something against its own interests. when you're a very small country surrounded by countries that want to see you go away, it is important that they not know all of your defenses. going back in the old testament, you find history, king his kaija -- king hezekiah showing all the defenses they had in their armory he showed them to the leaders from babylon. as a resu
of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as the special envoy for ron there was a strategy, both engagement. go back to 2009. the engagement has continued at a certain level, but then there has been the focus over the last couple of years on pressure, sanctions, and clearly the 40% drop in the value of a running currencies shows that actually is having t
in a situation where this administration cannot talk about much and foreign policy whatsoever. congressman, you get the last word on this. >> on the president obama credit for being able to do one thing that i have not seen in the time that i know him, which is to get senator graham as upset as i have never seen him about anything. and he punches above its weight class. he is engaged on benghazi. kelly ayotte, john mccain, jason chivers, some of us are young enough that we will be around matter how much they want to store mall. we will be around to get the answers, especially for the families of those four murdered americans. lou: coppersmith, we appreciate you being here and your efforts are congressman trey gowdy. >> thank you. lou: much more on benghazi, and the testimony of general petraeus later in this broadcast. negotiations about the fiscal cliff. partisan rhetoric is rampant. can this president and these leaders really reach a deal? acclimate ron christie join us in moments. final resolution. the deadly bp oil spill results in record fines and multiple criminal charges. we will have t
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
-election foreign policy priority but it needs to be a priority for several reasons. iraq is a success. it is because of the efforts of the united states and our allies and iraqi people. it is an important success because it is right in the middle of the middle east. it ties into every other problem from iran to sunni-shia relation and energy. it is a democratic state with a lot of flaws. it is a functioning democracy and that is a good day and we need to do our best to continue to encourage. the administration is putting a lot of quiet effort into this and this needs to continue. there are several serious risks. the biggest is that syria will pull iraq asunder as the various groups go in various directions. so far, that has not happened but the longer the situation in syria is allowed to continue, the more likely that very bad scenario will occur. one of the main reasons we kept our troops in iraq and lost 4500 tubes was to maintain the unity of iraq. that depends on plurality and democracy. that's all we have now with all its faults and the need to be supported. the other major threa
. coincidentally or not, that 26 of october is the same day that to journalists for foreign policy magazine discovered classified documents detailing security concerns in benghazi. they found those documents lying on the floor of what remained of the u.s. consulate. that, three weeks after the fbi had finally made its way to benghazi to conduct an investigation, an investigation that took less than a day. there has been no explanation as to why the fbi left those classified state department papers on the ground. adding to the coincidences' c'mon the 26 of october, it was on that date that fox news cia operators on the ground in benghazi had asked for, and were denied help four times during the course of the 7-hour assault ambassador christopher stephens, foreign service officer sean smith and cia operatives tie ron woods and glendora the from both former seals were killed in a firefight that move from the cause led to the cia and makes a mile away. a cautionary note tonight, if i may. we want to be very clear that what we are reporting, regardless of sources, of the very best journalists an
. john, u.s. foreign policy in the middle east, maybe elsewhere, but in the middle east right now in the wake of libya and benghazi, we are at low ebb, john, in the eyes i dare say of middle eastern countries and in the eyes of european countries and maybe in the eyes of asian countries. our cia director is gone. there's some kind of sex scandal going on. they all testified today on benghazi. no one knows what came out of that. my point is this, if president obama is asking the president of egypt who has sympathies with all these terrorists and guerrillas, where's the clear statement that the united states government supports the right of israel to defend itself, just flat-out from the president himself? >> the president of the united states, beginning of arab spring, chose the wrong side, larry. he chose the arab strongmen. they now believe the president can be treated as a chump and they can attack israel without risking themselves. that's what's going on right now. i mention this. there is a good report that that missile that landed in tel aviv was not fired from the gaza strip
? >> there is something to be done. first of all a change in our united states foreign policy. we need to start looking at other groups other than the muslim brotherhood and create a balance of power between both. jenna: sounds like something we'll be talking about for some time to come. a lot of movement in the region. a lot of forces at work. great to have you on the program as always. >> thank you, jenna, washington gearing up to tackle the impending fiscal cliff but the president and the speaker of the house john boehner each drawing lines that they say they will not cross. the major hurdles, that threat to send the economy into a tailspin, that's coming up next. >>> plus a nascar race turning into a full-scale brawl. look at this. mayhem breaking out of the everybody going at it. we'll tell you what set it off. after this. ve lately. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward.
especially in foreign policy. i know susan rice. i've known her a long time. she's honorable, experienced, dedicated. and i got those intelligence briefs in the morning whenever we were dealing with the crisis. >> when you were u.n. ambassador? >> when i was u.n. ambassador. you act and say what your intelligence briefing said at the time. but then those intelligence briefings change because there's an ongoing investigation of what happened in benghazi. >> she went on the five sunday talk shows five days or so after the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that killed the u.s. ambassador and three other americans. and what she said was not accurate. but she insists she was just repeating what she had been briefed by the intelligence community. >> that's the information she had. and i think just apart from that, wolf, a president should have the right to nominate who he wants for secretary of state. >> but the senate has the right to confirm or reject, right? >> i know. but the candidates if it's senator kerry, susan rice, ambassador rice, two excellent candidates, i mean, i don't thin
congress on foreign policy. megyn: i do want to say this, simon, is -- so he has this liberal think tank called nxn, and at ndn.org if you go to simon rosenberg blogs, you will see simon's full defense of susan rice, and it is an interesting read, and it espouses your position well, because i missouri you've taken a lot of incoming -- [laughter] >> particularly here, megyn. megyn: i recommend people check it out and make up your own minds. >> thanks, megyn. >> thank you. megyn: well, we saw one more dramatic moment on libya yesterday when our own ed henry asked the president what he would say to the families who lost loved ones in this benghazi that day about the lack of answers? here's the president's answer, in part. >> i'll address the families not through the press, i'll address the families directly, as i already have. megyn: next hour, we will speak to one family member directly when the father of one of the navy seals who was killed in benghazi joins us live. >>> and the dow jones average is down about 25 points today, but down more than a thousand points over the last few weeks.
in the christian conservative community. it does seem, to me, to have evolved. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the christian community is now or conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> yeah. i mean, we're still looking at the postelection survey that we, um, commissioned, that we got very early this morning, about 5 a.m. but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i've seen throughout my career, you know? there's a tendency to sort of caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and sort of suggest that they live in trailer parks, and they're poor, not educated and easy to command, and they cling to their guns and their religion, and they vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs by the exact same percentage that the entire electorate did. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the righteous and the unrighteous alike. so evangelicals and faithful catholics are underwater on their mortgages. they're also struggling. they're trying to
a foreign policy legacy that he didn't have the political capital to do in his first term. if i were the obama administration, i would appoint bill clinton as a middle east peace envoy. he has credibility both on the israeli street and in the arab world with the camp david accord s and with the clinton global initiative. we, as americans, the united nations has to get involved. we have to send a message to both israel and palestine that there's absolutely no military violence solution to the israeli/palestinian conflict. it can only be a peaceful and political one. >>> today's talk back question, should [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. . >>> now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, should politicians have a mandatory retirement age? it was a simple question, if you're 27. or maybe those over 50 are way too sensiti
security foreign policy team in the days leading up to the revelation unwelcome and surprising and shocking to the president two days after he was re-elected because it happened. >> all of this tension, too, within the administration now between the justice department, between the fbi -- >> absolutely. >> -- and the cia. this question of whether to tell the president, when to tell the president -- >> whether to tell anyone. >> along those lines -- >> they made a decision which i think will come in ultimately for a fair amount of criticism which is the decision not to tell the president about it. >> i want to ask andrea a question, not a glib question but a serious question because you have covered powerful men for the last chunk of years, of all walks of life. i want to redirect to what's important. is it fair to say we should not in any way be surprised when men of power, conquers, village leaders are also womanizers, that one could argue that goes with the profile, and can we stop going -- when it happens? >> frankly, you know, that's what foreign diplomats have been saying in the last da
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)